‘This is the joy that we’re supposed to know and feel’: Tasmanians say Queensland Mission School has left them able to love others more freely and desire to reach heaven

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Home > Media > News > ‘This is the joy that we’re supposed to know and feel’: Tasmanians say Queensland Mission School has left them able to love others more freely and desire to reach heaven
‘This is the joy that we’re supposed to know and feel’: Tasmanians say Queensland Mission School has left them able to love others more freely and desire to reach heaven

A Tasmanian contingent of 28 participants, missionaries and sisters joined more than 300 young people and families in Toowoomba in January for the annual 10-day Immaculata Mission School.

An initiative of the Sisters of the Immaculata, based in Franklin, Tasmania, the mission school attracted participants from as far away as New Zealand, Germany and France.
Youth and young adults were joined by families comprised of parents and children of all ages, with child and young teenager streams running alongside the main sessions.

Keynote speaker Ralph Martin of Renewal Ministries in the USA spoke on the spiritual life and the narrow road, while Archbishop Julian spoke on the Holy Spirit. Other topics included Theology of the Body, Mary, the Church and the importance of praise.

Tony Bradley, of Margate, attended the mission school with his wife, Rachel, and son, Nathaniel.

“Listening to Ralph Martin gave you a whole different perspective as a lay person about what our mission in the Church is,” Mr Bradley said.

“It was good to hear people talk about our faith as it should be and what it was built on and what a lot of it means and why we have this faith and what this faith is all about,” he said.

“Being able to talk to the other men there, other dads there with their families, and to realise that we’re all going through the same struggles, we all have the same pressures in life – you feel as though you’re not alone. I think as a family we obviously grew deeper in our faith.”

Mr Bradley says he now feels more inspired to reach for heaven.

“There’s the opportunity for everyone to be a saint.”

For 17-year-old Adele, of Garden Island Creek, the mission school complemented what she’d experienced at December’s Australian Catholic Youth Festival in Perth.

“During this year’s mission school, I felt a lot of love – that I received a lot of love from the Father. And it’s being filled up so that I can give of myself more freely,” Adele said.

“[Since the Mission School] it’s just been a lot easier to do everything really, to just be there for other people, to just love others more freely and be more free really.”

She said that that the talks were ‘really deep’.

“They really went into all the issues and they really left nothing out in terms of our faith and what is not talked about. They really did not leave anything out.”

She says that meeting other young people was a highlight of the mission school, and that she took away the realization that her experiences at Mission School were part of lived, Christian reality.

“The truth is, what we were experiencing was reality and that’s how it’s supposed to be,” Adele said.

“I think it’s kind of grown on me – ever since ACYF I’ve been thinking: this is it – this is the joy that we’re supposed to know and feel.”